Rosemary / Rosmarinus Officinalis

Rosemary in culinary or therapeutic doses is generally safe; however, precaution is necessary for those displaying allergic reaction or prone to epileptic seizures.

Rosemary essential oil may have epileptogenic (can cuae epileptic seizures) properties, as a handful of case reports over the past century have linked its use with seizures in otherwise healthy adults or children.

Rosemary essential oil is potentially toxic if ingested. Large quantities of rosemary leaves can cause adverse reactions, such as coma, spasm, vomiting, and pulmonary edema (fluid in the lungs) that can be fatal. Avoid consuming large quantities of rosemary if pregnant or breastfeeding.

Rosemary contains a number of potentially biologically active compounds, including antioxidants such as carnosic acid and rosmarinic acid. Other bioactive compounds include caffeic acid, ursolic acid, betulinic acid, rosmaridiphenol, and rosmanol.

Rosemary may also be useful in the prevention and treatment of headlice

Cultivation notes


Since it is attractive and tolerates some degree of drought, it is also used in landscaping, especially in areas having a Mediterranean climate. It is considered easy to grow for beginner gardeners, and is pest-resistant.

Rosemary is easily pruned into shapes and has been used for topiary. When grown in pots, it is best kept trimmed to stop it getting too straggly and unsightly, though when grown in a garden, rosemary can grow quite large and still be attractive. It can be propagated from an existing plant by clipping a shoot 10–15 cm (3.9–5.9 in) long, stripping a few leaves from the bottom, and planting it directly into soil.

Added by wikiherbia on Wed 22 Aug 2012 on 12:13 pm GMT

Updated by wikiherbia on Thu 23 Aug 2012 at 3:33 pm GMT